Home Reviews Siempre a tu Voz, Homenaje a Beny Moré en su Centenario (Egrem)

Siempre a tu Voz, Homenaje a Beny Moré en su Centenario (Egrem)

276
0

SIEMPRE A TU VOZ is a joyous celebration of “El Barbaro del Ritmo’s” 100th birthday. Also, it’s a showcase for the Cuban singer, Omara Portuondo and the Failde Orchestra, led by the flutist Ethiel Failde; the great-great-grandson of the renowned musician, bandleader Miguel Failde (1852-1921) and the composer of Las Alturas de Simpson – the first danzon heard in Cuba, which premiered in 1879.

Conceptually, Siempre a Tu Voz sets out to put the orchestra’s “stamp” on Beny Moré’s music. Also, to give Omara space and the opportunity to do what she does best.

Omara and the orchestra are joined by an all-star cast, which includes the renowned Dominican singer, Johnny “El Caballo” Ventura; the Cuban rapper and musician, Telmary Diaz; vocalists William Vivanco and Yurisán Hernández, who do a marvelous job of capturing Beny More’s sound and spirit with a contemporary twist.

The repertoire covers a lot of ground: Beny More hits such as Las Mulatas del chachacha, Como Fue, Bonito y Sabroso and Mata Siguaraya. Also, romantic boleros, a bolero-cha, cha-cha, and several upbeat numbers, including the newly composed title track and the feisty La Mucura, featuring the ageless Johnny “El Caballo” Ventura.

The Failde Orchestra is a 16-piece powerhouse made up of students and recent graduates from Cuba’s most exceptional school’s. It is known for its high level of musicianship, consummate showmanship, and diverse repertoire.

According to Ethiel, Siempre a Tu Voz represents “an embrace of generations and the continuity of Cuban music.” The fact that Omara is approaching 90 and the average age of the band is 24 is proof!

As the title track proudly proclaims, “Time passes, but your voice lives on!” Siempre a Tu Voz will appeal to Beny and Omara’s followers, but on a broader scale, the diverse and contemporary repertoire will appeal to listener’s of all ages.

You will be happy to know that Orchestra Failde has two new albums in the works, which consists mostly of danzones, Cuban classics, and original music. The first covers a century of Cuban music. The second features an unnamed Mexican singer and celebrates the cultural ties between Cuban and Mexico (as does the video, Bonito y Sabroso). Release dates have yet to be announced. Long Live Beny Moré!

Tracks: You’ll stay; The Mulatas Del Chachachá; As was; Pretty And Tasty; And Today As Yesterday; I pray at night; Mata Siguaraya; Oh, Life !; La Múcura; Always Your Voice.

Musicians: Failde Orchestra: Ethiel Failde – Flute; Yurisán Hernández – Lead voice in 1, 4 and 10; Yerlanis Junco choirs – Main voice in 10 and chorus; Roldany Hernández – Piano in «Te Quedarás»; Andy Cantero – Double bass in 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 and electric bass in «Y Hoy Como Ayer»; Rosalí Bazán – First violin; Katerina Pérez – Second violin; Lucio Carriera – Tumbadoras on all topics except 3 and 8; batá in «Las Mulatas Del Chachachá»; Rey Manuel Silveira – Timbal on all subjects except 1 and 10; Manuel Alejandro Acosta – Trumpets on all topics except “Always Your Voice”; Karel Samón – First trumpet in 2, 4 and 9; Adrián Peña – Trombone; Mario Rodríguez – Alto saxophone in 1 and 5; Wilbert Tarajano – Choirs; Guest Musicians: Caribbean Nostrum String Quintet in “¡Oh, Vida!”; Andrés Coayo – Minor percussion, misceláneas and güiro in all the subjects; timbal in 1 and 10; Alejandro Falcón – Piano in 2, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10; José Antonio González – Piano in 3, 5 and 6; Jorge Coayo – Tumbadoras in 3 and 8 maracas, batá in 7; Lázaro Antonio González (Tonito) / First trumpet in «Mata Siguaraya»; Luis Chávez – Trumpet in “Siempre Tu Voz”; Yuniet Lombida – Baritone Sax in “Bonito Y Sabroso”; Víctor Luis Guzmán – Baritone Saxo in “Siempre Tu Voz”; Roberto Vázquez – Baby bass in 9 and 10; Special Guests: Johnny Ventura «La Múcura»; Telmary Díaz “Las Mulatas Del Chachachá”; Willliam Vivanco – «Mata Siguaraya»; Arrangers: Alejandro Falcón – 2, 4, 7, 8 and 9; José Antonio González – 1, 3 and 5; Roniel Alfonso – 10 batá in 7; Lázaro Antonio González (Tonito) / First trumpet in «Mata Siguaraya»; Luis Chávez – Trumpet in “Siempre Tu Voz”; Yuniet Lombida – Baritone Sax in “Bonito Y Sabroso”; Víctor Luis Guzmán – Baritone Saxo in “Siempre Tu Voz”; Roberto Vázquez – Baby bass in 9 and 10; Special Guests: – «Mata Siguaraya»; Arrangers: Alejandro Falcón – 2, 4, 7, 8 and 9; José Antonio González – 1, 3 and 5; Roniel Alfonso – 10 batá in 7; Lázaro Antonio González (Tonito) / First trumpet in «Mata Siguaraya»; Luis Chávez – Trumpet in “Siempre Tu Voz”; Yuniet Lombida – Baritone Sax in “Bonito Y Sabroso”; Víctor Luis Guzmán – Baritone Saxo in “Siempre Tu Voz”; Roberto Vázquez – Baby bass in 9 and 10; Special Guests: Johnny Ventura «La Múcura»; Telmary Díaz “Las Mulatas Del Chachachá”; Willliam Vivanco – «Mata Siguaraya»; Arrangers: Alejandro Falcón – 2, 4, 7, 8 and 9; José Antonio González – 1, 3 and 5; Roniel Alfonso – 10 Telmary Díaz “Las Mulatas Del Chachachá”; Willliam Vivanco – «Mata Siguaraya»; Arrangers: Alejandro Falcón – 2, 4, 7, 8 and 9; José Antonio González – 1, 3 and 5; Roniel Alfonso – 10 Telmary Díaz “Las Mulatas Del Chachachá”; Willliam Vivanco – «Mata Siguaraya»; Arrangers: Alejandro Falcón – 2, 4, 7, 8 and 9; José Antonio González – 1, 3 and 5; Roniel Alfonso – 10.

A graduate of Empire State College with a dual major in journalism and Latin American studies, Editor-in-Chief Tomas Peña has spent years applying his knowledge and writing skills to the promotion of great musicians. A specialist in the crossroads between jazz and Latin music, Peña has written extensively on the subject. His writing appears on Latin Jazz Network; Chamber Music America magazine and numerous other publications.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here